Adverb Clause: Definition, Types, Practice Questions & Answers

Adverb Clause – Adverbs or adverbs in English, of course, have been known since the beginning of learning English. An adverb is a word or expression that is used to modify an adjective, verb, clause, preposition or a sentence.

While the clause is a link that connects the predicate. Generally, a clause consists of a subject and a predicate. Then what about adverb clauses ?. To understand more about this statement clause, see the discussion below.

Definition of adverb clauses

Adverb clause is a clause as an adverb. Adverbs that are in independent clauses are useful for answering questions such as how , when , where and why . Adverb clauses function as modifiers or explanations for verbs in a sentence. This adverb clause is usually preceded by a subordinate conjunction.

Subordinate conjunction is a word or phrase that is used to connect dependent clauses and independent clauses. This word or phrase shows that the clause has informative value to add an idea to the sentence. In addition, it can indicate a causal relationship. For example, after (after), because (because), when (when), though (despite) and others.

 

 

Adverb Clause Component

Adverb Clause Formula :
Subordinate Conjunction + Subject + Verb

Subject: is the actor, or someone who does a job or verb. This subject answers the question who (who) or what (what). This subject can be a pronoun (He, She, etc.), it can be a noun (a cat, a bird), a noun phrase (small children, an old lady) , it can even be a verb (to leave, swim , etc.) other).\

 

Adverb Clause Example

She came home very late. 
He came home very late.

A dog crossed the street. 
A dog crossed the road.

An old lady can be hyperactive. 
A middle-aged woman can be hyperactive.

Swimming is my favorite exercise. 
Swimming is my favorite sport.

Subordinate Conjunction: most adverb clauses appear marked with a subordinate conjunction. This conjunction determines a sentence context that can show time, place, condition, and so on.

Example:
Time: when (when), after (after), before (before), since (since), while (when).
Reason: because (because), since (since), so (so).
Conditions: if (if), unless (unless).
Comparison: more than (more than), less than (less than).

The difference between adverb clauses and adverb phrases

When talking about clauses, it’s important to know how they differ from phrases. Adverb clauses always have a subject and a predicate.

Example:
If she is late…
if she is late

When I saw my father..
When I saw my father

Before I go back to the office
.

Meanwhile, an adverb phrase does not have a subject and a predicate.

Example:
very carefully , quite easily, to understand better , for happily ever after , yesterday morning , after a few minutes ( after a few minutes), etc.

 

Difference between Adverb Clause and Adjective Clause

Previously, we discussed how to distinguish adverb clauses from adverb phrases. It’s easy enough to remember how to tell the difference. Next, we will discuss the differences between adverb clauses and adjective clauses. Adjective clause is a dependent clause that modifies a noun or pronoun . Meanwhile, adjective clauses explain nouns or noun phrases which answer the question which or what type of .

Example of an Adjective Clause:
The grand piano, which was my father’s favorite , did not fit into my new apartment. 
The grand piano, which was my father’s favorite, didn’t suit my new apartment.

John, who won the lottery , just went to Europe. 
John, who won the lottery, goes to Europe.

Jane broke the car which she was given for her birthday.
Jane destroys the car that was given for her birthday.

As can be seen from the examples above, adjective clauses answer the question which (which) and describe nouns (nouns). Another distinguishing feature of adjective clauses is that you can’t move them around in a sentence without breaking the grammatical structure of the sentence. However, with adverb clauses, there’s usually no problem with it, and its position in the sentence can be changed very easily.

which was my father’s favorite , the grand piano did not fit into my new apartment.
which was my father’s favorite, the grand piano didn’t suit my new apartment.

See also  difference between air and wind

The grand piano did not fit into my new apartment, which was my father’s favorite .
The grand piano didn’t suit my new apartment, which was my father’s favorite.

When you change the structure of an adjective clause, the sentence becomes disconnected. Actually this can be an easy way to determine whether the sentence is included in an adverb clause or an adjective clause. If you are confused, try moving the clauses. If it feels weird, it’s an adjective clause.

 

 

Examples of Adverb Clauses in Sentences

As previously discussed, for adverb clauses the position can be changed in a sentence. It can be placed at the beginning of a sentence, in the middle or even at the end of a sentence. The following are examples of adverb clauses in different positions in the sentence.

At the Beginning of the Sentence

Before you leave , please close the door. 
Before you go, please close the door.

When we went to the zoo , my sister saw a giraffe for the first time in her life. 
When we went to the zoo, my sister saw a giraffe for the first time in her life.

After the baseball game had finished , we went to a bar .
After the baseball game ended, we went to the bar.

Although I haven’t finished my homework , I am watching a movie.
Even though I haven’t finished my homework yet, I watched a movie.

Because he loves her so much , he forgives what she did.
Because he loved her so much, he forgave what he had done.

 

In the Middle of a Sentence

My friend, when he is angry , his face will turn red.
My friend, when he is angry, his face will turn red.

 She remembered, after she left the office , that she needed to mail the birthday party invitation. 
He remembered, after he left the office, he needed to send out the birthday party invitations.

My girlfriend, when she was sad , was better left alone.
My boyfriend, when he is sad, is better left alone.

John, although it was cold , was only wearing a shirt. 
John, even though it was cold, was only wearing a T-shirt.

Jane, after she bought a new bicycle , was rarely seen at home.  
Jane, after she bought a new bike, is rarely seen at home.

 

At the End of the Sentence

We can swim at the beach as soon as you put sunblock on. 
We can go swimming at the beach as soon as you put on sunscreen.

My father canceled our trip because the weather has gotten worse.  
My father canceled our trip because the weather was getting worse.

Turn the TV off so that we can eat our breakfast 
Turn off the TV, so we can eat our breakfast.

She needs to find a restaurant where they ask her to wait.
He had to find a restaurant where they asked him to wait.

He must keep practicing the movement until he gets it right .  
He had to keep practicing his moves until he got them right.

 

Types of Adverb Clauses

Adverb Clauses of Time

Adverb clause of time is an adverb clause that explains when the incident took place. Conjunctions that can be used are: when (when), whenever (whenever), before (before), after (after), while (when), until (until), since (since) and others.

Example:
I stopped walking when I saw my teacher .
I stopped walking when I saw my teacher.

 

Adverb Clauses of Place

Adverb clause of place is an adverb clause that explains where the incident took place. Conjunctions that can be used are: where (in which), wherever (wherever), and others.

example:
Wherever I go , I always see Burger King restaurants .
Wherever I go, I always see a Burger King restaurant

I will go everywhere you go .
I will go wherever you go.

 

Adverb Clauses of Conditions

Adverb clause of condition is an adverb clause that explains the conditions that occurred when the incident took place. Conjunctions that can be used are: if (if), unless (unless), and others.

Example:
I only go to the cinema if my favorite actress is playing .
I only go to the movies if my favorite artist is playing.

He won’t pass the final term unless he studies hard for the exam .
He wouldn’t make it through the last semester unless he studied hard for the exams.

See also  Experimental Text Report: Structure, Characteristics, and Functions

 

Adverb Clause of Manner

Adverb clause of manner is an adverb clause that explains how the incident took place. Conjunctions that can be used are: as if (as if), like (like), and others.

Example:
My father talked to me like I was a child .
My father spoke to me like I was a child

 

Adverb Clauses of Reason

Adverb clause of reason is an adverb clause that explains why the incident happened. Conjunctions that can be used are: because (because), since (since), and others.

Example:
I listen to old songs because I love them . 
I listen to old songs because I like them.

 

Adverb Clause of Effect

Adverb clause of effect is an adverb clause that explains a consequence or effect. Commonly used conjunctions are: so .. that (so), such .. that (such as that), and others.

example:
 I was  so tired that I couldn’t barely walk .
I’m so tired I can barely walk.

 

Adverb Clause of Comparison

Adverb clause of comparison is an adverb clause that explains the difference in something. Commonly used conjunctions are: than (more than), as..as.. (like), and others.

Example:
She is as beautiful as her mother . 
She is beautiful like her mother.

 

Adverb Clauses of Contrast

Adverb clause of contrast is an adverb clause that describes a contrasting statement even though something is happening. Commonly used conjunctions are: although (though), while (when), even if (even if), and others.

example:
Although it rained , I enjoyed our walk. 
Even though it was raining, I enjoyed our outing.

 

 

Adverb Clause Problem Practice

1. I waited for my friend …. She arrived.
a. up to
b. untill

2. he hid …. his parents could not find him.
a. where
b. when

3. I am as brilliant …. my mom
a. as
b. so

4. …. she was not there, I left a note under her door.
a. as
b. therefore

5. My brother was …. tired that he could barely walk.
a. such
b. so

6. … you drink too much alcohol, you may get sick.
a. unless
b. if

7. I saw a crab …. I was walking down the beach.
a. after
b. while

8. Don’t forget to drink your milk … you go to sleep.
a. when
b. before

9. I promise I will call my mother …. I got there.
a. while
b. after

10. Don’t bother to meet me …. you have any problem.
a. whenever
b. after

11. …. you don’t know where you are going, just stay.
a. so
b. if

12. We keep our vegetables in the fridge …. it doesn’t go bad.
a. so that
b. a

13. You need warm clothes to go hiking in the mountains …. it is so cold.
a. because
b. before

14. You shouldn’t drive alone …. drinking alcohol.
a. if
b. after

15. You need to finish your homework …. going to bed.
a. while
b. before

Adverb Clause Question Answers

1. I waited for my friend until she arrived.
I waited for my friend until he arrived.

2. He hid where his parents could not find him.
He hid where his parents couldn’t find him.

3. I am as brilliant as my mother.
I’m smart like my mom.

4. As she was not there, I left a note under her door.
Since he wasn’t there I left a note under his door.

5. My brother was so tired that he could barely walk.
My sister was so tired that she couldn’t even walk.

6. If you drink too much alcohol, you may get sick.
If you drink a lot of alcohol, you can get sick.

7. I saw a crab while I was walking down the beach.
I saw crabs when I was walking on the beach.

8. Don’t forget to drink your milk before you go to sleep.
Don’t forget to drink your milk before you go to sleep.

9. I promise I will call my mother after I get there.
I promised to call my mom when I got there.

10. Don’t bother to meet me whenever you have any problems.
Don’t bother to see me whenever you get into trouble.

11. if you don’t know where you are going, just stay.
if you don’t know where you’re going, keep quiet.

12. We keep our vegetables in the fridge so that it doesn’t go bad.
We store our vegetables in the fridge so they don’t go bad.

13. You need warm clothes to go hiking in the mountains because it is so cold.
You need warm clothes to climb the mountain because it will be very cold.

14. You shouldn’t drive alone after drinking alcohol.
You shouldn’t drive yourself after drinking alcohol.

15. You need to finish your homework before going to bed.
You have to finish your work before you go to bed.

Sinaumed’s, that’s an explanation of adverb clauses that you should know. You can learn grammar deeper through the best books at www.sinaumedia.com . sinaumedia has always been #FriendsWithoutLimits for those of you who want to deepen your English.

Author: Zarqa Khalifa Hurin