Conditional and Subjunctive Sentence Material and Example Problems

Conditional material and subjunctive verbs are both conditional sentences. However, the subjunctive is rarely used because the conditional sentence is enough to replace the subjunctive sentence. To understand better, let’s watch it to the end!

Conditional Sentence Material

One of the forms of conditional sentences with the characteristics of the subordinate clause begins with the word if (if) and the main clause uses capital. Conditional consists of if clause (sub-clause) and main clause (main clause). Then it was developed into 3 pair formulas.

1. Conditional Type 1

Used to express suppositions that are made based on facts in the present or in the future and these suppositions may occur. The “if” clause is usually in the simple present tense.

Example: If I see you tomorrow, I will buy you a drink

If clause : If I see you tomorrow
Main clause: I will buy you a drink.

Or

Main clause: I will buy you a drink
If clause: If I see you tomorrow.

We often use unless which means “if not”

Unless you hand in your homework, I won’t mark it

If clause: Unless you hand in your homework,
Main clause: I won’t mark it.

I mean
If clause: If you don’t hand in your homework,
Main clause: I won’t mark it.

Or

Main clause: I won’t mark your homework
If clause: Unless you hand it in.

mean
Main clause: I won’t mark your homework
If clause: If you don’t hand it in

2. Conditional Type 2

Used to express an unreal situation in the present or future. This type is used to express a hope. The tenses used in the if clause are simple past tense.

Example: If I won the quiz, I would buy a new house

If clause: If I won the quiz
Main clause: I would buy a new house

or

Main clause: I would buy a new house
If clause: If I won the quiz

Notes: The use of would or wouldn’t is prohibited in the if clause.

3. Conditional Type 3

Used to express a condition in the past that is unlikely to occur again. Often used to criticize or regret. The tenses used in the if clause are the past perfect tense

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If clause: If I had worked harder
Main clause: I would have passed my exam.

If clause: If I had worked harder
Main clause: I could have passed my exam.

If clause: If I had worked harder
Main clause: I should have passed my exam.

Or

Main clause: I would have passed my exam
If clause: If I had worked harder.

Main clause: I could have passed my exam
If clause: If I had worked harder.

Main clause: I should have passed my exam
If clause: If I had worked harder

To make it more practical, pay attention to the following formula!

Now we look for facts on conditional type 2 and type 3 according to the practical formula above:

Supposition:
If he studied he would pass the exam. -> V2 (+)

If he had studied he would have passed the exam. -> Limited V3 (+)

Fact:
He doesn’t study so he doesn’t pass the exam. -> V1 (-)

He didn’t study so he didn’t pass the exam. -> V2 (-)

Subjunctive Sentence Material

Sentences that express expectations that are usually contrary to reality.

1. Future Subjunctive

Example:
I wish Amin would go to the office tomorrow.
(I hope Amin can go to the office tomorrow.)
(In fact Amin won’t go to the office tomorrow/Amir won’t go to the office).

2. Past Subjunctive

Example:
I wish I were a doctor.
(I wish I was a doctor.) (In fact I am not a doctor).

3. Past Perfect Subjunctive

Example:
I wished I had typed a letter.
(Supposing (past) I had typed a letter.)
(In fact I didn’t type a letter).

Examples of Conditional and Subjunctive Sentence Questions

1. Had my parents had enough money, I would have studied at this academy. From this sentence we know that the speaker …
a. failed the entrance test
b. was a student of the academy
c. had applied for a scholarship
d. was not a student of the academy
e. had not been given a scholarship

Discussion: Sentences in the form of conditional type 3 (main clause: past future perfect–would have V3/been, subclause: past perfect–had V3/been) in the form of inversion (removing the word ‘if’ by placing the auxiliary had at the front of the sentence) . The conditional type 3 pattern states something contrary to what actually happened in the past. The question sentence has the meaning: If my parents have enough money, I will study at this academy. This meant that my parents actually didn’t have enough money, so I didn’t study/was not a student of the academy.

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2. … I can drive, I often ask my brother to drive me to the city.
a. since
b. When
c. because
d. Whether
e. Although

Discussion: The fact that I can drive with the fact that I often send my sister to drive me to town is a synergistic counter. Of the answer choices, there is a conjunction that shows a synergistic counter, although.

3. The Tourist bus came to our school thirty minutes late … we had repeatedly told the driver to be on time.
a. even though
b. so that
c. because
d. provided that
e. in order that

Discussion: The causal sentences above state a contradiction. The conjunction (conjunction) to express conflict is ‘even though’ (even though).

3. I don’t have a laptop. If I … a laptop, I would lend it to you.
a. have
b. had
c. having
d. has

Discussion: Sentences are conditional sentence type 2 patterns. So in the if clause, sentences are used in the simple past form.

4. You are the teacher and I am the student. If I …, I would give a lot of excercises.
a. am
b. are
c. becomed
. were

Discussion: The sentence is a conditional sentence type 2, so the sentence pattern in the if clause uses the simple past. Because the sentence is nominal, the to be used is were.

It’s really easy to understand the use of conditional sentences and subjunctive sentences. The conclusion is that Type 1 is an assumption that is likely to occur.

Types 2 and 3 are the impossible assumptions. Facts for type 2 are present (did not occur in the present) and for type 3 are past (did not occur in the past).

Then for the subjunctive sentence is a sentence to show expectations or assumptions that are different from reality.