difference between a hurricane and a typhoon

The Difference between a Hurricane and a Typhoon Explained

Natural disasters are a force to be reckoned with, and two of the most dangerous atmospheric disturbances are hurricanes and typhoons. Despite being caused by similar atmospheric conditions, there are differences between the two that make them unique. Let’s have a look at what sets them apart.

Geographical Location

The biggest difference between hurricanes and typhoons is their location. Hurricanes form in the Atlantic or the eastern Pacific, while typhoons form in the western Pacific Ocean. The distinction between the two is important because it affects how different countries prepare and respond to the potential risks.

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Size and Strength

Typhoons tend to be smaller in size than hurricanes, but they can pack a more powerful punch. The average typhoon can have wind speeds of up to 150 mph, while hurricanes tend to have that as a maximum point. However, hurricanes are larger in size and scope.

Direction

Another difference between hurricanes and typhoons is their direction of rotation. Hurricanes rotate counter-clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. In contrast, typhoons rotate clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and counter-clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.

Naming Conventions

Naming conventions also differ between hurricanes and typhoons. When a typhoon occurs in the western Pacific, it is named by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Meanwhile, the World Meteorological Organization’s Regional Specialized Meteorological Center in Miami, Florida, names hurricanes that form in the Atlantic, while hurricanes that form in the eastern or central Pacific Ocean are named by the National Hurricane Center, affiliated with the same governing body.

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In conclusion, while hurricanes and typhoons share many similarities, they have distinct characteristics that set them apart. Geographic location, size and strength, direction of rotation, and naming conventions all help to distinguish one from the other. Regardless of the name or geography, both hurricanes and typhoons are significant threats, and preparation should always be taken seriously to minimize their impact on lives and property.

Table difference between a hurricane and a typhoon



Hurricane vs Typhoon

Hurricane vs Typhoon

Category Hurricane Typhoon
Definition A tropical cyclone that forms in the Atlantic Ocean or northeast Pacific Ocean. A tropical cyclone that forms in the northwest Pacific Ocean.
Direction of Rotation Counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. Counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.
Strength Scale Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale Japan Meteorological Agency scale or the Tropical Cyclone Intensity Scale
Formation locations Atlantic Ocean or northeastern Pacific Ocean Northwest Pacific Ocean
Typical Season June 1 to November 30 in the Atlantic Ocean and May 15 to November 30 in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. May to November in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.
Frequency Less common than typhoons. More common than hurricanes.
Danger Areas The Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and eastern coast of the United States. Eastern and Southeast Asia, Northern Australia, and the Philippines.
Notable Hurricanes Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Andrew. Typhoon Haiyan, Typhoon Mangkhut, Typhoon Halong.