difference between trypsin and pepsin

Difference Between Trypsin and Pepsin

Enzymes are essential for many biological processes to take place in the body. Trypsin and pepsin are two enzymes that play important roles in the digestive system. Although they share some similarities, they also have some distinct differences. In this article, we will explore the difference between trypsin and pepsin and how they contribute to digestion.

What is Trypsin?

Trypsin is an enzyme that is produced in the pancreas and is released into the small intestine. It is a proteolytic enzyme that breaks down protein into smaller peptides. Trypsin is activated in the small intestine by the enzyme enterokinase. Once activated, it begins to break down protein molecules into amino acids.

What is Pepsin?

Pepsin is an enzyme that is produced in the stomach and is released into the stomach lumen. It is also a proteolytic enzyme that breaks down protein into smaller peptides. Pepsin is activated by hydrochloric acid present in the stomach, which lowers the pH of the stomach and activates pepsinogen to pepsin. Pepsin then begins to break down protein molecules into smaller peptides.

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What is the Difference Between Trypsin and Pepsin?

The main difference between trypsin and pepsin is their site of production and activation. Trypsin is produced in the pancreas and activated in the small intestine, whereas pepsin is produced in the stomach and activated by hydrochloric acid. Trypsin breaks down protein in the small intestine, while pepsin breaks down protein in the stomach. Another significant difference between the two enzymes is their specificity for different types of protein. Trypsin specifically cleaves proteins at the carboxyl end of lysine or arginine residues, while pepsin cleaves at the carboxyl end of aromatic residues.

Conclusion

In conclusion, trypsin and pepsin are two important enzymes that are involved in the digestion of protein. While they both have a similar function, their site of production, activation, and specificity for different types of protein are different. Understanding the difference between trypsin and pepsin can help us understand how our digestive system works and how we can maintain our digestive health.

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Table difference between trypsin and pepsin

Trypsin Pepsin
Enzyme Enzyme
Secreted by pancreas Secreted by stomach
Optimal pH: 7.5-8.5 Optimal pH: 1.5-2.5
Breaks down proteins into smaller peptides Breaks down proteins into smaller peptides and amino acids
Activated by enterokinase in small intestine Activated by low pH in stomach
Acts on peptide bonds next to basic amino acids (lysine and arginine) Acts on peptide bonds next to acidic amino acids (aspartic and glutamic acid)